Manure Manager

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Midwest Manure Summit highlights new technologies


January 21, 2011
By Manure Manager

lambeaufieldJanuary 10,
2011, Green Bay, WI – The animals on Wisconsin farms produce a lot of milk and meat. They also produce a lot of manure. One cow alone creates about 54,000
pounds (6460 gallons) of manure over the course of a year. Handling manure is a
challenge for any dairy or livestock producer.

January 10,
2011, Green Bay, WI – The animals on Wisconsin farms produce a lot of milk and meat. They also produce a lot of manure. One cow alone creates about 54,000
pounds (6460 gallons) of manure over the course of a year. Handling manure is a
challenge for any dairy or livestock producer.

In the past, daily hauling
or some kind of storage pit were basically the only and obvious ways to deal
with manure. We still use daily hauling and long term storage, but other
options in manure handling and processing are surfacing as well. What are some
of the new options available? Where have they worked? Are they applicable here?
These are some of the questions that will be tackled at the 2011 Midwest Manure
Summit
.

lambeaufield  
   

University of
Wisconson-Extension
will host the Midwest Manure Summit on Feb. 15 and 16,
2011. For these two days, the legendary Lambeau Field in Green Bay, WI, will
become the meeting place of dairy and livestock producers, government agency
workers, agribusiness professionals, and educators as we take a closer look at
the processing and handling of manure.

Speakers from near and far
will be on hand to bring their knowledge and expertise right here to Wisconsin.
Topics and speakers include:

  • Air Quality, What’s coming
    in 2011, and What should you do? John Ferguson, P. Eng, Conestoga-Rovers &
    Associates
  • Utilizing Biofilters for
    Air Emissions and Odor Reduction from Animal Production and Waste Storage
    Structures. Dr. Joe Taraba, University of Kentucky
  • European Perspectives on
    Technical and Economical Approaches to Phosphorus Recycling. Dr. Marie-Line
    Daumer, Cemagref, France
  • USDA Developed
    Technologies for Recovering Manure Phosphorus. Dr. Ariel Szogi, USDA-ARS South
    Carolina
  • Managing Manure to
    Minimize Environmental Impact. Dr. Joe Harrison, Washington State University
  • Making Digesters Work: The
    Economics of Bedding and Cofeeding. Dr. Dana Kirk, Manager, ADRE Center,
    Michigan State University
  • Ecological Impacts on
    Future Farming. Dr. Ann Wilkie, University of Florida
  • Profitability of Digesters
    – If I Knew Then, What I Know Now. Bob Nagel, D.V.M., Holsum Dairy, Chilton WI

A dozen other breakout
sessions will also be held throughout the conference. These breakout session
topics include small-scale digesters, treatment options for dairy wash water,
alternative bedding challenges, and odor study results.

There is still time to
register! The registration deadline is Feb. 8 and the registration fee is $195
per person, which includes meals and breaks, proceedings, and a tour of Lambeau
Field
.

More details and
registration information about the Midwest Manure Summit can be found at the
conference website, www.midwestmanure.com. You can also contact one of the
conference chairs:

  • Paul Dyk, 920-929-3171, paul.dyk@ces.uwex.edu,
  • Mark Hagedorn,
    920-391-4610, mark.hagedorn@ces.uwex.edu, or
  • Abby Huibregtse,
    920-834-6849, abby.huibregtse@ces.uwex.edu


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