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Biofilters eligible practice through EQIP


August 22, 2008
By Marg Land

biolfilterNEWS HIGHLIGHT

Biofilters eligible practice through EQIP
Livestock producers with confinement operations can now apply to
receive financial assistance through the U.S. Department of
Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to install
biofilters, odor-reducing structures fit to the outlet of confinement
exhaust fans.

Livestock producers with confinement operations can now apply to receive financial assistance through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to install biofilters, odor-reducing structures fit to the outlet of confinement exhaust fans.

biolfilterThrough the USDA’s Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), eligible producers can receive $2.50 per animal unit for three years, with a cap of 1,500 animal units, to install and maintain biofilters. EQIP is a voluntary conservation program through NRCS that promotes environmental quality in agricultural production.

A biofilter is a device or structure containing an organic material that filters out particulates. It contains active bacteria attached to the organic material that break down odorous compounds as they pass through the filter. It is a living ecosystem of microorganisms that continually feed on odorous gases.

Larry Beeler, NRCS assistant state conservationist for programs, says EQIP is available to help agricultural producers protect air quality and reduce the need for regulatory programs.

“There is more awareness of air quality issues than ever before,” he said. “We are offering biofilters as an eligible air quality management practice through EQIP as an incentive to producers who have considered installing odor-reducing practices and want to be proactive.”

According to Dr. Steven Hoff, an associate professor in Iowa State University’s department of agricultural and biosystems engineering , biofilters are very effective in reducing odor when designed correctly. His research indicates a reduction in odorous gases after emission from a biofilter compared to an unfiltered exhaust fan.


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