Manure Management
July 27, 2017, Arlington, WI – The North American Manure Expo – being held August 22 and 23 near Arlington, WI – provides the perfect venue to disseminate information about manure handling and management to livestock producers and custom manure applicators from throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Manure application techniques and technologies, environmental protection, safety and management tools, and manure as a fertilizer resource are just some of the topics being discussed at the event. Various continuing education units and credits from various states and certification programs will be available. Please visit manureexpo.org for a complete list.

A veritable miniature city dedicated to all things manure-related is being constructed in a field on the University of Wisconsin's Arlington Agricultural Research Station, located at N695 Hopkins Road. More than 90 manufacturers and service providers will be exhibiting their wares as part of the annual expo's trade show, open noon to 8:30 p.m. on August 22 and 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. on August 23.

To help open the trade show August 22, several exhibitors will be holding industry presentations in the education tents. These sessions will run from 4 to 6 p.m. and include a foam control demonstration with Profit Pro plus a gas safety seminar with MSA Professional Services.

Puck Custom Enterprises (PCE) will also be holding its Pump School that same evening from 4 to 6 p.m. on the show grounds.

Many manufacturers and businesses use the North American Manure Expo to launch new products so be sure to visit all the exhibitor booths in the trade show. You never know what new ideas and surprises await you.

Of course, the North American Manure Expo is more than a trade show. The event also features half-day tours featuring an on-farm dairy digester, dairy and swine manure processing plus dairy composting followed by agitation demonstrations on August 22, plus education sessions and a line up of compost, solid and liquid manure application demonstrations on August 23.

There are only a few weeks left before the show so register soon. Drop by manureexpo.org to check out the schedule, sign up for the tour of your choice and learn more about the event.
Published in Applications
July 25, 2017, Ledgeview - They moved to custom homes in rural Brown County for the peace, quiet and wide-open spaces.

They did not expect that a manure pit serving hundreds of cattle could be part of the bargain.

Residents of a development off Lime Kiln Road are scrambling to find ways to keep a nearby dairy farm from building a manure-storage facility near their neighborhood of custom homes valued from $440,000 to more than $600,000.

Neighbors fear the farm could be allowed to store millions of gallons of manure and leachate at the site. Those concerns have galvanized a group that includes doctors, lawyers and the head coach of the Green Bay Packers. Some barely knew each other mere months ago.

They're worried that a structure for storing animal waste threatens water quality, endangers children, and will harm the values of the homes on Beachmont Road, Meadow Sound Drive and other streets constructed in recent years on land that formerly was agricultural. READ MORE 
Published in News
July 27, 2017, Arlington, WI – Roughly one month remains to register for the 2017 edition of the North American Manure Expo, being held in Arlington, Wisc.

The annual show, which celebrates all things manure–related, is scheduled for August 22 and 23 at the University of Wisconsin's Arlington Agricultural Research Station, about 20 miles north of Madison.

Two days of demonstrations and educational opportunities have been planned for the expo. On August 22, attendees can choose from one of three tours featuring visits to a local dairy-based anaerobic digester, examples of swine and dairy manure processing, plus composting and low disturbance manure application.

Pit agitation demos will also be held at the research center in the afternoon. The trade show will open at noon and industry sessions, including Puck's Pump School, will be held later in the evening.

On August 23, the grounds will open at 7:30 a.m. and feature a full day of educational sessions covering everything from atmospheric emissions to soil health. Manure application demonstrations, including solid and liquid manure spreaders plus compost turners, are also planned.

In preparation for the upcoming expo, planning officials held a contest to update the event's collectible T-shirt, a favorite among attendees. More than 80 crap slogans were submitted and the public had an opportunity to vote from the top 50. The top 10 have been chosen and will be unveiled on the back of the 2017 Manure Expo T-shirt.

All those who submitted a slogan that made the top 10 will receive a free shirt.

The 2017 North American Manure Expo is being hosted by the University of Wisconsin, UW-Extension, and the Professional Nutrient Applicators' Association of Wisconsin, which also owns the event. Annex Business Media, publisher of Manure Manager magazine, serves as the show manager.

Registration is free and available online at manureexpo.org.
Published in Applications
July 21, 2017, Washington - The Washington State Department of Agriculture has ended its investigation into the release of fecal coliform-laced water that flooded a Yakima County community last winter, recommending that a dairy block off a manure compost pile or move it to higher ground.

Snipes Mountain Dairy was not fined or ordered to take action, but WSDA will inspect the farm in the fall, department spokesman Hector Castro said.

If the dairy doesn't respond to WSDA's concerns, the department could refer the case to the Department of Ecology, which also has jurisdiction over the dairy.

The dairy also could face more severe penalties by WSDA if it discharges polluted water again. "It certainly would be a factor," Castro said.

WSDA's notice to Snipes dairy stems from a March 1 flood that actually began on another farm.

Melting snow breached a berm around a field and flowed onto Snipes dairy. The floodwater wasn't polluted until it washed into the pile of manure, according to WSDA's investigation. The contaminated water eventually surrounded several homes a half mile away in Outlook. READ MORE 
Published in Dairy
July 20, 2017 - Take a tour of the McCormick Farms Reclamation System. This video demonstates how the McCormick Farm is able to clean barns and recycle the sands and separate the solids from the liquids in order to recycle all the bedding.

McCormick Farms values sustainable development, thus have an automated system integrated directly in the farm to keep the cows clean and reuse and recycle wastes.

Cows currently are all bedded with sand, so it is very important for the cows well-being that their bedding is kept dry. For more information, watch the video above!
Published in Dairy
July 19, 2017, Vermont -  You can tell a lot about a farm by looking closely at the soil. That's why the new, statewide program to recognize Vermont's most environmentally friendly farmers will be based on soil-sampling and monitoring.

Today, Governor Phil Scott announced the pilot launch of the new Vermont Environmental Stewardship Program (VESP), which will use soil-based analysis to identify farmers who are going above and beyond to protect our natural resources.

Surrounded by state and federal officials at the North Williston Cattle Company, owned by the Whitcomb family, Governor Scott emphasized the important role farmers play in Vermont communities.

The program is a partner effort by the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Vermont Association of Conservation Districts, Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, and the University of Vermont Extension.
Published in Business/Policy
July 19, 2017, Washington - The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announced July 7, an award of $1 million to the Stillaguamish Tribe for an innovative project in dairy nutrient management at Natural Milk Dairy in Stanwood.

As the lone recipient in Washington state of a nationally funded Conservation Innovation Grant (CIG), the tribe proposes to demonstrate successful implementation of an emerging animal nutrient treatment system for dairy farms.

The technology, originally developed to address human waste in developing countries, is now being adapted to treat dairy nutrients. READ MORE
Published in Profiles
July 18, 2017, Berlin/ Williston, Vermont - The Winooski Natural Resource Conservation District, in conjunction with the Vermont Association of Conservation Districts, UVM Extension and USDANRCS, are offering a program to help small farms write Nutrient Management Plans (NMP) to meet the new Required Agricultural Practices.

"By writing your own NMP you can: understand the nutrient needs of your soil, learn how to improve water quality and soil health on your farm, learn how to best use your manure on your land and meet a requirement of the state's Required Agricultural Practices." The Winooski Natural Resources Conservation District is here to help you at no cost. This free program for small farms that spread manure, benefits from District staff working one-on-one with the farmer to collect and analyze soil and manure and create an individualized plan through in class instruction.

Participants will receive a land treatment plan that identifies what management practices can be implemented that will protect not only water quality and soil health, but the economic viability of the farm.

Farmers in Chittenden and Washington County interested in participating in the NMP class or learning more about Agricultural Best Management Practices that can be implemented please visit: www.winooskinrcd.org or email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

The deadline to register for this years' class is July 31, 2017. Our updated website contains valuable resources and available assistance for farmers. In addition links to handouts, presentations and upcoming workshops on the new Required Agricultural Practices.

The Winooski Natural Resources Conservation District is one of 14 conservation districts throughout Vermont. It encompasses all of Chittenden and Washington County as well as parts of Orange County (Orange, Williamstown and Washington). The district relies on grants and individual donations to complete its conservation work. The WNRCD focuses its resources on completing conservation projects within the areas of agricultural assistance, forestland enhancement, urban conservation and watershed stewardship.
Published in Associations
July 17, 2017, Arlington, WI - Just over one month remains before the 2017 North American Manure Expo, being held August 22 and 23 near Arlington, Wisconsin.

Two action-packed days are planned, including tours, education sessions plus solid, liquid and agitation demos. More information is available at manureexpo.org.

Check out these highlights from previous expos and learn more about what you can't afford to miss.
Published in Equipment
July 17, 2017, Ames, IA – You might wonder what dry weather and feedlot runoff would have in common. On the one hand, the recent spell of hot, dry summer weather has caused expanding areas of moderate drought and excessively dry soils in Iowa and Nebraska. But this spell of dry conditions also makes for an excellent time to maintain your feedlot runoff control system.

Extended dry periods create the perfect opportunity to remove settled solids from your settling basin or other areas where manure solids collect during runoff events. Whether it’s a settling basin, a settling bench or terrace, or even the bottom end of feedlot pens, now is a great time to get out there with the loader, box scraper, or other equipment to remove those accumulated solids and dress up the area for the runoff that is sure to return. Land apply those solids if you have application areas available now, or stockpile them in a controlled area if they need to wait until after harvest for application. Make sure the stockpile area is either within the runoff control boundaries for your feedlot, or in an area that is protected from runoff and water flow when it rains. High and dry is the short description of a good stockpile location.

While you’re removing separated solids, be sure to check the liquid outlet from the settling area. If you’re using a picket dam or perforated riser to control the outflow, make sure the openings are clean and in good condition. Remember, the purpose of the controlled outlet is to hold liquid in the settling area until solids can settle, and then slowly drain the settled effluent off to an area where it can soak into the ground. Too much opening can let liquids through before solids can settle. Plugged openings can prevent dewatering and drying of the solids to a consistency you can handle.

While you’re tending to the settled solids removal, take the opportunity to evaluate the other parts of the system as well. Check the clean water diversion portions: rain gutters on buildings, clean water diversion terraces, and clean water tile drains. Then check your runoff controls beyond the settling area. If you pump your effluent to an application area, check the pump, controls and piping. If you let gravity do the work, follow the flow path down the hill from your settling area and see where it ends. If it ends on flat ground in a pasture, field, or treatment area, you’ll see a few more manure solids that settle and accumulate there, with no eroded gully beyond. If it ends in a waterway, ditch or stream, your manure could be causing negative impacts and putting your operation in regulatory and financial risk.

Assessment tools and advice are available in print, online, and from experts who can help. Check out the resource links on the Small Feedlot & Dairy Operations website or contact your industry representatives or an Iowa State University Extension dairy, beef, or engineering field specialist. Kits are even available from selected County ISU Extension offices to help you test water quality.

Managing manure runoff centers around more effectively collecting and storing manure, reducing the amount of clean water that mixes with manure, and capturing runoff so manure nutrients can be held and used as fertilizer. The good news is that each of these practices generates additional fertilizer value for your farm at the same time it lowers your risk exposure. So seize the opportunity to maintain your system and take some positive steps to put your manure where it pays.

Published in Beef
July 13, 2017, Paulding, OH – Farmers who want to learn more about creating fertile soil for crops and how to manage manure to improve profits, while also protecting the environment, should attend the Manure Science Review on August 2.

The Paulding Soil & Water Conservation District, Ohio State University Extension, Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), and Ohio Farm Bureau Federation are collaborating to host the event.

The event will be from 8:45 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Stoller Brothers & Sons farm, at 9257 Rd. 144, in Paulding. Paulding Dairy supplies the Stoller farm with manure and helps with manure management throughout the year, making the farm an ideal location for the event.

The field day will highlight how to use manure effectively to improve yields, understanding ODA manure application and recordkeeping rules, reducing nutrient runoff as well as the benefits that cover crops provide in the field.

"Attendees can learn how OSU Extension worked with livestock producers this spring to sidedress emerged corn with liquid manure using a soft drag hose," said Glen Arnold, OSU Extension Educator and field specialist in manure nutrient management systems. Farmers attach a metal toolbar to the tractor to receive manure and inject it three to five inches into the soil between the rows of growing corn. The manure in the ground is then covered with soil.

OSU Extension and industry specialists will speak at the event and lead the sessions throughout the day. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of Ohio State's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.

"The demonstrations offered at the event all highlight the importance of planning to ensure manure nutrients are available for crop use as well as to protect water quality by reducing the risk of nutrient runoff," said Mary Wicks research associate with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.

Field demonstrations will include controlling subsurface tile drainage, manure spreader calibration, manure application, sidedressing emerged corn, incorporating poultry litter, the use of frac tanks for rapid manure transfer, and smoking subsurface tiles where smoke is blown through the tile lines to see if there are pores in the ground.

"Smoking subsurface tile illustrates how natural pores in the ground from things like worm tubes and soil cracks can allow liquid manure into underground drainage, where the manure could eventually end up in surface water" said Wicks.

An optional emergency manure spill response demonstration will take place shortly after 3:30 p.m.

Continuing education units are available for a variety of professionals including Certified Crop Advisors, ODA Certified Livestock Managers, professional engineers, Indiana State Chemist (Cat 14 and RT.) and Pennsylvania Manure Hauler/Broker.

Registration is $25 per person if completed before July 24 and $30 per person afterwards. Breakfast and lunch are included with the registration fee. An online form and additional information can be found at ocamm.osu.edu.

For additional information about the event, contact Mary Wicks at 330-202-3533 or at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
Published in Applications
June 23, 2017, Arlington, WI – Time to clear the calendar and scrub off the rubber boots. The North American Manure Expo is coming.

The 2017 edition of the annual show celebrating all things manure–related is being held August 22 and 23, 2017, at the University of Wisconsin's Arlington Agricultural Research Station, located about 20 miles north of Madison near Arlington, WI.

"Wisconsin is very excited to be able to host the 2017 North American Manure Expo," said 2017 expo chairs George Koepp and Richard Halopka. "The theme for this expo is 'Innovation, Research, and Solutions' and it is driving our focus to showcase how manure application professionals, researchers, and industry are all working together to apply manure nutrients to our fields and crops in environmentally safe, efficient, and financially productive ways."

Two action-packed days have been planned for the expo. On August 22, attendees can choose from one of three tours featuring visits to a local dairy-based anaerobic digester, examples of swine and dairy manure processing, plus composting and low disturbance manure application. Pit agitation demos will also be held at the research center in the afternoon. The trade show will open at noon and industry sessions, including Puck's Pump School, will be held later in the evening.

On August 23, the grounds will open at 7:30 a.m. and feature a full day of educational sessions covering everything from atmospheric emissions to soil health. Manure application demonstrations, including solid and liquid manure spreaders, compost turners, plus a manure spill recovery, are also planned.

"This is a great opportunity for farmers, manure applicators, equipment manufacturers, and researchers to gather, share information, and develop even more environmentally friendly and effective ways to apply manure nutrients to our cropland," added Koepp and Halopka.

In preparation for the upcoming expo, planning officials are updating the event's collectible T-shirt, a favorite among attendees. 

The top 50 slogans received – as decided by expo planners – will be voted on by the public (VOTE NOW!) with the top 10 going on the back of the 2017 Manure Expo T-shirt.

Anyone who submits a slogan that makes the T-shirt will receive a free shirt.

The 2017 North American Manure Expo is being hosted by the University of Wisconsin, UW-Extension, and the Professional Nutrient Applicators' Association of Wisconsin, which also owns the event. Annex Business Media, publisher of Manure Manager magazine, serves as the show manager.

Registration is free and available online at agannex.com/manure-manager/manure-expo.
Published in Equipment
July 10, 2017, Raleigh, NC - Officials with the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality are testing water quality in Pott Creek northwest of Lincolnton after 200,000 gallons of manure spilled into the waterway earlier this week.

A pump malfunction Monday at the Gladden Dairy in Catawba County caused the manure to spill into the headwaters of nearby Pott Creek, which flows into the South Fork River, officials said.

All public water supply intakes from the spill location downstream into South Carolina have been notified of the spill.

The two downstream water supply intakes in North Carolina, the city of Lincolnton and town of Dallas, have voluntarily stopped withdrawing water from the river as a precaution. The utilities are instead using alternative water supplies or reserves to ensure drinking water remains safe.

There have been reports of a fish kill in Pott Creek and investigators have confirmed finding two locations with a total of nine dead fish.

Repairs to the dairy's waste management system are underway and the owners are working onsite to clean up the source of the spill.

State water quality officials will continue to monitor conditions in the creek and investigate the spill to determine any appropriate enforcement action. State and local officials will continue working together to address any water quality and public health concerns related to this spill.
Published in News
July 7, 2017, Ookala, Hawaii - Community activists on the Big Island are suing a dairy over ongoing pollution concerns despite previous citations from the state.

Kupale Ookala and the Center for Food Safety sued the Idaho-based company who operates the Ookala dairy on Hawaii Island's northern side.

The complaint cites ongoing concerns that runoff from the dairy polluted nearby communities, and violated the Clean Water Act when animal feces were released into streams and ocean water. READ MORE
Published in News
July 6, 2017, New York - If you buy a house on the 9 million acres of agricultural districts in New York state, you sign a disclosure form that says the farmers near you have the "right to farm" even when it causes noise, dust and odors.

Still, when a farmer decides to build a lagoon to store millions of gallons of liquid manure, the neighbors are often disappointed to find out they have little say in the matter. They can also be shocked to hear that government sometimes requires manure storage and even helps pay for it.

Since 1994, 461 manure storages have been built with state financial help, according to the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets. Others are privately or federally funded.

The "Right to Farm" is a state law that protects 25,316 farms on 6.5 million of those 9-million acres of agricultural districts. The rest of that land is occupied by people who do not farm.

Mike McMahon, of McMahon's EZ Acres in Homer, allowed us to fly a drone over the lagoon on his dairy farm and explained how it was designed.
McMahon, other farmers and government officials say storage is the best practice to protect the environment from runoff.

Storage allows farmers to spread manure on fields on only the best days - when the soil is dry and less likely to run off of wet and frozen ground into lakes and streams. READ MORE
Published in Storage
June 30, 2017, Arlington, WI – The 2017 North American Manure Expo – taking place August 22 and 23 at the University of Wisconsin's Arlington Agricultural Research Station near Arlington, Wisc. – provides the perfect opportunity for custom applicators and livestock producers to advance their knowledge of manure-nutrient utilization while showcasing the latest technology in manure handling, treatment and application.

Attendees can see the latest in innovation, research and manure management solutions by taking part in one of three tours scheduled for August 22.

Tours cost $20 to attend, which includes transportation and lunch. To help with logistics, preregistration is required and can be done by visiting manureexpo.org.

Tours include:

Tour #1 – Statz Brothers Inc, Sun Prairie, Wisc.
Visit a second-generation owned and operated dairy operation featuring two plug-flow anaerobic digesters that process the manure from 4,000 cows. The farm also recycles the leftover manure solids as bedding and has a 20 million gallon liquid manure storage structure. Statz Brothers hosted the Wisconsin Farm Technology Days in 2015 and grows 6,000 acres of corn, alfalfa, wheat and soybeans.

Tour #2 – Arlington Agricultural Research Station, Arlington, Wisc.
The 2,000-acre Arlington station is home to the University of Wisconsin's Emmons Blaine Dairy Cattle Research Center, which houses 430 milking cows, 100 dry cows and more than 50 calves. Tour attendees will visit the operation's sand bedding processing and recycling center. They will also visit the UW Swine Research and Teaching Center's manure settling system where the liquid portion of the manure is applied through irrigation. There will also be an opportunity to visit the research station's manure runoff study plots.

Tour #3 – Endres Berryridge Farm, Waunakee, Wisc.
Learn more about composting manure and bedded pack systems. Attendees will hear about windrowing and composting dairy manure under roof, topdressing alfalfa fields using compost and recycling composted dairy manure as bedding.

All tours will leave from the North American Manure Expo site at the Arlington Agricultural Research Station, N695 Hopkins Road, Arlington. Check-in starts at 8 a.m. with buses departing by 9 a.m. Don't be late or you could forfeit your seat on the tour.

After the tours, all attendees will have lunch at the research center's Public Events Building. Following lunch, they will return to the show grounds for the opening of the trade show plus an agitation demonstration at the center's dairy lagoon, scheduled for 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. The show grounds will be open until 8 p.m.

Tour attendees are invited back for day two of the expo on August 23. The grounds will open at 7:30 a.m. and feature a full day of educational sessions covering everything from atmospheric emissions to soil health. Manure application demonstrations, including solid and liquid manure spreaders, compost turners, plus a manure spill recovery, are also planned.

The 2017 North American Manure Expo is being hosted by the University of Wisconsin, UW-Extension, and the Professional Nutrient Applicators' Association of Wisconsin, which also owns the event. Annex Business Media, publisher of Manure Manager magazine, serves as the show manager.

Registration is free and available online at agannex.com/manure-manager/manure-expo.

Don't forget to vote! The North American Manure Expo's crappy T-shirt contest is on now. Vote here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/33RMZXT
Published in Equipment
June 29, 2017, Collomsville, PA - A number of Limestone Township homeowners and farmers who have been dealing with fly infestations, which they accredit to nearby poultry farms, held a meeting in Limestone Township Monday night.
Published in News
June 23, 2017, Lansing, MI – The MSU EnviroImpact Tool is a new online tool that provides maps showing short-term runoff risks for daily manure application planning purposes—taking into account factors such as precipitation, temperature, soil moisture and landscape characteristics.

Farmers handling and applying livestock manure in Michigan can use this tool during any time of year to determine how risky it will be to spread manure on their fields.

"The MSU EnviroImpact Tool, jointly funded by MSU and MDARD, provides the latest technology in weather forecasting at the fingertips of Michigan farmers," said MSU Extension Agriculture and Agribusiness Institute Director Dr. Ronald Bates. "This online, mobile-friendly tool helps farmers assess their risk of possible runoff as they develop their manure spreading schedules. Farmers have the ability to adjust their management plans if a rainfall event on particular fields is imminent—enabling them to make better management decisions and improve their ability to protect Michigan's water quality."

The MSU EnviroImpact Tool is part of a multi-state regional effort to improve "Runoff Risk Decision Support" tools. 

Runoff Risk Decision Support tools are a unique example of collaboration between federal and state agencies, universities, and the agricultural industry to develop real-time tools and provide guidance to help address the issue of nutrient application timing.

While the purpose of this tool is to help reduce the risk of applied manure leaving agricultural fields, it is very important that farmers also follow Manure Management Plans and assess the risk for each field prior to manure applications.

Livestock producers and manure applicators can contact their local Conservation Districts or MSU Extension for help in developing a Manure Management Plan. Another resource for making manure application decisions is MDARD's Right to Farm Generally Accepted Agricultural Management Practices for Manure Management and Utilization.

"This initiative helps provide farmers with the latest tools necessary for farming profitably while reducing risks to Michigan's environment," said Joe Kelpinski, Manager of MDARD's MAEAP program. "The MSU EnviroImpact Tool, coupled with tools like the 'Manure Application Risk Index' and the 'Winter Manure Spreading Risk Based Decision Making Tool,' will give producers a suite of tools to apply manure to their fields and satisfy crop production needs more efficiently, effectively, and safely."

In the coming months, partners will continue to reach out to farmers, manure applicators, and others to increase awareness of this new beneficial tool. Those interested in viewing or using the MSU EnviroImpact Tool can visit www.enviroimpact.iwr.msu.edu.

For questions or comments, please contact Shelby Burlew at MSU Extension at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; Jason Piwarski at the MSU Institute of Water Research at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; or Kip Cronk at Michigan Sea Grant at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
Published in Applications
June 22, Wiota, WI — As farms have gotten larger and the equipment and storage facilities necessary to accommodate that growth have gotten bigger with them, the risk of injury and death on those farms has also increased.

About 75 emergency response personnel and farmers gathered June 12 at Cottonwood Dairy Farm just outside Wiota for a training session designed to help them understand the hazards of manure storage and handling systems. The workshop focused primarily on confined space and manure as safety procedures.

Cheryl Skjolaas, UW-Madison/​Extension agriculture safety specialist, and Jeff Nelson, UW-Madison machinery specialist and volunteer firefighter, took participants to various spots on the farm to see the farm's manure pits and associated equipment during the training session.

They talked about equipment that is safe to use in confined spaces, such as gas monitors and ventilation equipment, and fall protection devices. READ MORE
Published in Dairy
June 21, 2017, Fair Oaks, IN – On June 16, Midwestern BioAg was joined by more than 80 local farmers, media and staff to celebrate the grand opening of its new TerraNu fertilizer manufacturing plant.

The event, hosted at Fair Oaks Farms in Fair Oaks, IN, featured remarks from Midwestern BioAg leadership and Mike McCloskey, co-founder and chairman of the board at Fair Oaks Farms. READ MORE




Published in Companies
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