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Researchers compare solid manure injection to broadcast, incorporation


March 30, 2009
By Farmscape

March 30, 2009, Humboldt, Sask. – Research conducted by the University
of Saskatchewan shows solid manure injection compares equally with
broadcast application and broadcast and incorporation.

March 30, 2009, Humboldt, Sask. – Research conducted by the University of Saskatchewan shows solid manure injection compares equally with broadcast application and broadcast and incorporation.

The University of Saskatchewan’s Department of Soil Science has completed the first two years of a three-year evaluation of the performance of a solid manure injection system developed by the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute at Humboldt.

The prototype uses hydraulic augers to place solid manure into the soil in bands in channels at about a 10-centimeter depth.

Research scientist and adjunct professor Dr. Jeff Schoenau says scientists are looking at how this method impacts nutrient availability, crop yield response, nutrient recovery and how it may influence the movement of nutrients with run-off water.

 “We’re working now just with one manure type which has been passively composted for about one year,” said Dr. Schoenau. “I would anticipate the type of manure that was used with this would affect what a person saw in terms of performance.”

During the 2007 and 2008 seasons, the researchers didn’t observe any effect from the placement of the manure.

“We’ve got comparisons of broadcast, broadcast incorporate and then the solid manure banding,” said Dr. Schoenau. “We haven’t seen a big difference in crop recovery or yield response to the different placements. That might be a function of just the kind of manure that we’re using, which actually most of it is in the organic form in this particular solid manure that we have.

“Certainly in our trials overall, we are seeing a significant response to the cattle manure, especially when we supplement it with urea fertilizer nitrogen.”

Dr. Schoenau notes this particular kind of manure doesn’t have a high potential for gassing off and losing nutrients to the atmosphere compared to other types of manure, which may explain why the placement has had a limited impact on agronomic performance.


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