Manure Manager

News
Program takes on variable manure syndrome


April 2, 2008
By Manure Manager

Manure can be an obvious sign of a
cow’s current digestive performance, and it can tell farmers a lot
about what’s going on during the digestive process.

Manure can be an obvious sign of a cow’s current digestive performance, and it can tell farmers a lot about what’s going on during the digestive process. Variable manure syndrome (VMS), or a drastic swing from loose to normal to firm manure, indicates rumen pH instability and subacute or clinical acidosis, says Priority One.

Manure variation from day to day means the rumen has changed from a continuous fermenter to a batch fermenter, which alters the bacterial profile significantly and kills digestive microbes that fuel a healthy digestive process. VMS leads to poor digestion, undigested feed in the manure, and less than optimum feed efficiency.

The company’s P-One Program is said to protect against VMS. Priority One’s genomic DNA research has resulted in the proprietary A4000h (hybrid) and A2020 strains after competitive testing against other strains for pH tolerance, bile tolerance, intestinal survival, bacteriocin production, competitive exclusion, antibiotic compatibility, intestinal colonization, and rumen survival. Discoveries include digestive microbes that will perform specific digestive functions like converting lactic acid to a more energy efficient propionate.   

www.priorityiac.com


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