Manure Manager

Equipment Equipment Manure Handling
Pennsylvania governor invests in water projects


July 19, 2012
By PR Newswire

Topics

Jul. 19, 2012, Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Corbett today announced the investment of $87 million in 18 non-point source, drinking water, and wastewater projects in 18 counties through the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PENNVEST). 

‘The projects funded at today’s PENNVEST meeting will bring both environmental improvements and much needed new jobs to areas all across our state,’ Corbett said. ‘This funding is an investment in the future health of our citizens and our economy, both of which are of critical importance to me and my administration.’

Of the $87 million total, $77 million is for low-interest loans and $10 million is offered as grants.

The awards range from a $131,000 grant to eliminate nutrient discharges from a stream in Lancaster County and, ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay to a $17.7 million loan/grant combination for a project in Lycoming County to eliminate the discharge of waste from on-lot septic systems into publicly accessible areas.

The funding comes from a combination of state funds approved by voters, federal grants to PENNVEST from the Environmental Protection Agency and recycled loan repayments from previous PENNVEST funding awards. Funds for the projects are disbursed after bills for work are paid and receipts are submitted to PENNVEST.

For more information, visit www.pennvest.state.pa.us

PENNVEST Non-Point Source Projects:

Bucks County
Bucks County Equestrian Initiative received a $157,627 loan and a $122,078 grant to construct a manure storage facility, grassed waterways, animal trails and other improvements to alleviate nutrient runoff into nearby impaired streams and ultimately the Delaware River.

Lancaster County
Lancaster County Conservation District received three funding awards for projects in different areas of the county:

  • A $131,613 grant to construct manure-handling facilities on the Benuel King dairy farm to eliminate nutrient discharges into Calamus Run, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay.
  • A $470,542 loan to construct manure-handling facilities on the Sam Glick farm to eliminate nutrient discharges into the Octorara watershed and ultimately the Chesapeake Bay.
  • A $221,905 grant to construct manure-handling facilities on the Sam Miller farm to eliminate nutrient discharges into Little Beaver Creek, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay.

PENNVEST Drinking Water Projects:

Armstrong and Clarion counties
Redbank Valley Municipal Authority received a $346,000 loan to install alternate power source facilities in order to eliminate power fluctuations to the treatment plant that compromise the plant’s ability to effectively operate and assure healthy water quality.

Carbon, Luzerne and Schuylkill counties
Hazelton City Authority received a $5,917,075 loan to replace approximately 15,260 household water meters that will allow the authority to reduce water losses by quickly detecting leaks in the system.

Fayette, Greene and Washington counties
Southwestern Pennsylvania Water Authority received an $8,660,300 loan to upgrade and expand the authority’s Tin Can Hollow water treatment plant, including new filters, pumps and other facilities that will ensure a safe and reliable source of water both for household consumption and fire protection.

Potter County
Galeton Borough Authority received a $520,127 loan to breach two impoundment dams and replace them with stream channel infiltration facilities that are not only less expensive to maintain but also provide increased water availability, particularly during low-flow conditions.

Somerset County
Jefferson Township Water and Sewer Authority received a $768,111 loan and a $550,889 grant to construct approximately five miles of water distribution lines and a new water storage tank to eliminate the use of contaminated drinking water wells in the village of Bakerstown.

Washington County
Pennsylvania American Water Company received a $2,250,000 loan to construct over six miles of water distribution lines and a booster pump station to serve various areas of the county where over 50 percent of the private drinking water wells are contaminated with coliform bacteria.

PENNVEST Wastewater Projects:

Armstrong County
West Hills Area Water Pollution Control Authority received a $10,435,500 loan new sewage collection lines and a pump station to serve areas of East Franklin Township and Buffalo Township where malfunctioning on-lot systems and wildcat sewers are discharging raw sewage into Glade Run and a tributary of the Allegheny River.

Beaver County
Rochester Borough Sewer and Maintenance Authority received a $1,147,283 loan and a $1,379,717 grant install more than a mile of new sanitary and storm sewers to eliminate the wet weather discharge of untreated sewage into McKinley Run, Beaver Run and the Ohio River.

Butler County
Buffalo Township Municipal Authority received a $1,560,670 loan to expand the authority’s treatment plant and upgrade a pumping station to eliminate overloading of the plant and to accommodate additional wastewater flows, particularly from local businesses that will expand their operations as a result of this project and thereby create 90 new full-time jobs.

Cambria County

  • Johnstown City received a $10,898,000 loan to install almost seven miles of new collection sewers to eliminate wet weather overflows of untreated sewage into Stony Creek.
  • Johnstown Redevelopment Authority received a $9,052,570 loan to construct more than three miles of replacement interceptor sewers to eliminate wet weather overflows into the Conemaugh River.

Lycoming County
Tiadaghton Valley Municipal Authority received a $14,146,008 loan and a $3,717,312 grant to construct a new wastewater treatment plant, eight miles of new collection sewers and a pump station to eliminate the use of malfunctioning on-lot septic systems that are discharging inadequately treated waste into publicly accessible areas and also to meet nutrient discharge limits required under the Chesapeake Bay initiative.

McKean County
Hamlin Townshipreceived a $2,424,173 loan and a $2,383,827 grant to construct more than seven miles of sewage collection lines to eliminate the use of malfunctioning on-lot septic systems that are discharging inadequately treated sewage into local streams. The project will also allow businesses to expand and create 50 new jobs in the area.

Mifflin County
Burnham Borough Authority received an $8,679,268 loan and a $1,492,732 grant to construct a new treatment plant and replace combined sewer facilities in order to eliminate excess nutrient discharges into the Chesapeake Bay watershed as well as allow for local business expansions that will create 91 new full-time jobs.


Print this page

Related



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*