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MSU manure research receives funding from Animal Agriculture Initiative


February 4, 2009
By Michigan State University

February 4, 2009, East Lansing, MI – Nine Michigan State University
(MSU) animal agriculture research and Extension projects will share
$350,000 in funding awarded by the Animal Agriculture Initiative (AAI)
Coalition for 2009-2010 including some involving manure management.

February 4, 2009, East Lansing, MI – Nine Michigan State University (MSU) animal agriculture research and Extension projects will share $350,000 in funding awarded by the Animal Agriculture Initiative (AAI) Coalition for 2009-2010 including some involving manure management.

The nine projects were selected from 20 pre-proposals submitted to the AAI Coalition requesting a total of more than $787,000 in funding. Proposals were ranked on the basis of how well they addressed the issues identified as high priority by industry groups, MSU Extension area of expertise teams and the AAI Coalition.

Projects funded for 2009-2010 involving manure management issues include:

  • Investigation of DDGS Feeding Effects on Sulfur Emissions from Swine Manure, Wendy Powers, MAES animal science and biosystems and agricultural engineering scientist.
  • Bark Filter Mound Treatment Technology to Treat Milking Facility Waste Water, Steven Safferman, MAES biosystems and agricultural engineering scientist.
  • Constructed Treatment Wetlands for Water Reclamation and Green Manure Production, Dawn Reinhold, MAES biosystems and agricultural engineering researcher.
  • Motivation, Barriers and Incentives for the Participation of Livestock Operations in MAEAP, Steven Miller, Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics.

The AAI is Michigan’s animal agriculture research, teaching and Extension initiative housed at MSU. It is a partnership between MSU, livestock producers and industry organizations, and the Michigan Department of Agriculture and is governed by the AAI Coalition. Its objective is to address challenges facing Michigan animal-based agriculture through research and Extension projects.


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